A Reflection from John Bartunek, LC, THD

Christ the Friend

 

This is Jesus’s first encounter with his first disciples. It is the beginning of the second half of human history-an important occasion. Surely the evangelist is describing every detail with care, most especially the very first words that Jesus speaks in the Gospel. He asks the future Apostles a simple question: “What do you want?” (What do you seek? What are you hoping for?) It is still one of Christ’s favorite questions. Jesus     already knows the deepest desires of every heart, but many people never take the time to reflect on their own deepest desires. Jesus poses the question in order to spur that kind of reflection. Unless we take time to   examine ourselves and our lives, we can easily end up looking for meaning and happiness in the wrong places, mindlessly latching onto every passing fancy and popular guru, bouncing from fashion to fad, never drinking the living water that only he can give.

 

Christ in my Life

 

Where do you live Lord? I want to find you and stay with you. You are the creator of the mountains, the ocean, the clouds, and the stars. You are wisdom that gives order to the universe. You are the spark of light that gives man a knowing mind and a loving heart. You are the source and goal of all things. And you have come to live in my heart. You are mine, and I am yours. Let me stay with you…

 

I need a teacher, Lord, and I choose to sit at your feet and listen to you. Sometimes I find myself yearning so much to understand things– to have true wisdom– that I am almost in pain. You made me with a need for truth. You are Truth. Speak to my heart, Lord. Send your Spirit to teach and guide me. Never take your eyes off of me…

 

What do I want? I want so many things! I want happiness, Lord. I want happiness for myself and for those around me. Fulfillment, meaning, satisfaction. I want my life to bear the fruit you created it to bear. I want to look into your eyes and see you smile on the day you call me home to eternity, and I want to hear you say, “Well done, good and faithful servant…”

 

0 Comments

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *